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Serenade No. 11 in E-flat major, K. 375 – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

  1. Allegro maestoso
  2. Menuetto
  3. Adagio
  4. Menuetto
  5. Allegro 

Peripatetic and versatile, Mozart spent his life travelling between Austria, Italy and France writing operas, symphonies, five violin concertos, some 30 concertos for one, two, or three pianos and various concertos for other instruments and works. Haydn called him the greatest composer he had known, a sentiment fully subscribed to by Mahler, Strauss, Tchaikovsky and many others. His Clarinet Concerto and his Gran Partita are recognised as his greatest achievements for wind instruments.  

The Serenade No. 11 in E-flat major K. 375 was composed by Mozart on 15 October 1781 for St Theresa’s Day. It was originally scored for six players – two clarinets, two horns and two bassoons. Mozart later revised the score to include parts for two oboes.

Lisa White (oboe 1), Caren Bam (oboe 2), Daniel Prozesky (clarinet 1), Annelize de Villiers (clarinet 2), Simon Ball (bassoon 1), Brandon Phillips (bassoon 2), Caroline Prozesky (horn 1) and Conrad van der Westhuizen (horn 2)

Serenade No. 12 in C minor, K. 388 – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

  1. Allegro
  2. Andante
  3. Menuetto in canone
  4. Allegro 

Of the more than 600 works that Mozart wrote in his short lifetime, several were devoted to the woodwinds, a section he is said to have made into stars. Mozart was perhaps the first to write parts for specific instruments – up until this time, the woodwind parts had been interchangeable, but he took the distinctive characteristics of each instrument into account and dedicated a part to each. Bassoonists can be grateful that he elevated that instrument from continuo to full player.  

The Serenade No. 12 in C minor, K. 388 is one of Mozart’s most puzzling and mysterious works. It is orchestrated for an ensemble that is traditionally employed for light entertainment, yet it is defiantly dark in its character. Musicologists are not even truly certain when it was composed, although watermark research and other evidence have placed the composition at circa 1782.

Lisa White (oboe 1), Caren Bam (oboe 2), Daniel Prozesky (clarinet 1), Annelize de Villiers (clarinet 2), Brandon Phillips (bassoon 1), Simon Ball (bassoon 2), Caroline Prozesky (horn 1) and Conrad van der Westhuizen (horn 2)

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